DVA


Track Listing

  • 1.Animak
  • 2.Tatanc
  • 3.Fattal
  • 4.Tropikal Animal
  • 5.Baltik
  • 6.Tihop
  • 7.Tuér
  • 8.Hap Hej
  • 9.Numie
  • 10.Huhu
  • 11.Tralala
  • 12.Uhuh
  • 13.Valibela

Artist Bio

Circus, cabaret, beatbox, tango, popsongs, acoustic electro and electro acoustic in two layers cover. Human voices and acoustic instruments in loops. Lyrics in universal languages. Folklore of non exist nations. Somewhere between north and south, where Dva means 2.


The third album of the duo Dva bears the name of HU (short for Hungary, or fifth most common surname in the world, an ancient Egyptian first word for “god” or a kind of goat). But in their language, for Dva it also means the first syllable pronounced by a human being as well as the sound of monkeys and owls. After the previous concept of folklore of non-existing nations with which they worked on the album Fonók (2008, Indies Scope), Dva come with the concept of pop of non-existing radios. For collaboration on this album they again chose the Berlin producer Jayrope.

Press

album Hu - Pop of non-existing radios


The third album of the duo Dva bears the name of HU (short for Hungary, or fifth most common surname in the world, an ancient Egyptian first word for “god” or a kind of goat). But in their language, for Dva it also means the first syllable pronounced by a human being as well as the sound of monkeys and owls. After the previous concept of folklore of non-existing nations with which they worked on the album Fonók (2008, Indies Scope), Dva come with the concept of pop of non-existing radios. For collaboration on this album they again chose the Berlin producer Jayrope.

There has been almost two years between Hu and Fonók recordings. And really busy two years. Besides the extremely busy touring schedule (more than 150 concerts all around the world) Dva worked on music for theater performances. DVA’s music was chosen by Deutsche Telekom for their advertising campaign for the German market. The album Fonók was keenly appreciated by critics, significantly succeeded in WMCE Europe, was nominated for the prize Anděl 2008, ranked fourth as the best Czech-Slovak album of the past decade according to the editors of Musicserver. “Originally, we wanted to be the happiest album of all times,” say DVA. “But in the end, everything changed a bit and somehow couple of melancholic moments snack in. Now those songs are rather happy melancholic pop-songs.”  

HU originated in July 2010 in a cottage called “At the Devil’s” in the almost abandoned Padouchov village. “On this album, there are thirteen songs written in non-existent world languages, listened to on thirteen non-existent radio stations”. After the album Fonók, which lyrics were mostly about cold northern regions, the album Hu is dedicated to animal motifs and tropical and southern countries.

In the attic home studio where DVA recorded also the album Fonók the recording equipment is very simple and effective: radio mixer Studer once set aside by the Radio Free Europe, AKG microphones from 1948 and this time the very necessary voice recorder. The band again comes with original and elaborate song forms full of singing in its own language. Compared to Fonók there is much more sampling here this time. Of course, DVA only draw inspiration from their own resources – they use and arrange parts of their own field recordings which they often place in an unexpected context or change beyond recognition. The fundamental creative impulse for the creation of many songs on this album was Dva’s this year’s tour on the tropical island of Reunion. “We wanted most of the songs to be created here. Every day, just to take the banjo and record the entire album acoustically on voice recorder. In the end, we couldn’t bring the banjo on the plane. Most of the songs were created in May in Pardubice (Czech republic)." The band tried to transfer their strong experience from Reunion into the songs - thanks to that, the album radiates almost tropical atmosphere. You can hear here monkeys’ bray and sounds samples from the streets of St. Joseph in Reunion as well.

Consequently when recording the album the duo turned into hunters of “disturbing” sounds in intervals between studio work; the recorded sounds from an open window or in local woods. That’s why you can hear sounds of flying planes, mooing cows, a bumble bee or a neighbor – beekeeper who plays a 150 years old trumpet. In the arrangements the band also used sounds of cottage equipment, such as cans, bottles or old dishes. Honza Kratochvíl again praises the cooperation with Berlin producer Jayrope. “He liked the new songs so much that many things from our original material remained; stuff that we considered provisional. But what we really liked was what he brought into those songs in Padouchov. So, after Fonók, there is another proof that we have really understood each other perfectly.”  

The experienced radio technician Josef Švarc (Bára Švarcová’s father) has assisted the recording the entire time. The final mix and mastering took place in the studio Vitaliana Zurla in Berlin; once again on the analogue tape. The album, using old technology and Jayrope producer skills, retains a homely atmosphere.


Dva created the best audio for independent game - Award IGF

Amanita Design's point and click exploration game Botanicula received the award for Excellence in Audio with its original soundtrack and sound effects, created by Czech alternative band DVA.


DVA talk about their SXSW 2012 experience

DVA – aka the husband-and-wife duo Bára and Honza Kratochvíls – are one of the hottest Czech music exports around. Captivating audiences with their idiosyncratic audio world, they weave a magical sound which they’ve dubbed “folklore of nonexistent nations” and “pop from nonexistent radios”. Their sonic accompaniment to the video game Botanicula has been awarded the prestigious Independent Games Award in San Francisco. En route – and on the road driving from Frisco through Arizona to Texas - back to the Czech Republic, they popped by Austin to play the sprawling music showcase SXSW.

 

Bára: There are three ways bands get to the festival. They either have to cover their own expenses and in addition 'pay to play'. Then there are bands who went through some sort of programming selection and don't have to pay to be able to play there – only the expenses – which was our case. The last group is invited by the festival. We were supposed to attend the awards ceremony in San Francisco so we thought we might as well play 2,500 miles away on the same continent, no?

Honza: Officially, about 3,000 bands play at the SXSW and unofficially in the many bars and hangouts the numbers swell. The program is as thick as a phone book and bands which share the first letter in their names spread on two A4 pages. Thus there are also three ways to get noticed:
1. You're an American and live in the States, or you are European and are good with contacts and lucky enough to invite some music industry people before they put you in their spam folders.
2. You hire a PR agency who invites these people and hopes that they will like the gig and write about it.
3. A PR agency won't get involved but instead, the cultural institute of the country of your origin will. For instance, after our gig an Austrian band played. Everything was sorted out for them by somebody from the Austrian cultural institute who also paid for their flights, as well as the flights for the label and manager. Most of the European countries had a promotion stand there. A Czech band could get a Danish bandmember, for instance, and try to promote themselves through Denmark.
4. If you are going there without making use of any of the above, it's probably best to consider it a sort of a holiday. We were lucky that we primarily flew to San Francisco and SXSW was more or less a bonus.

We stayed with some hippies on the outskirts of Austin who made perfect margaritas. We arrived in the evening. In the morning, somebody from a Texas radio station took us to the registration spot and interviewed us in the car. After having spent several hours in the registration process, we checked out and met Longital (a Slovak band) by chance. This was great, since they had already been at SXSW before and explained everything to us. Hideout, the venue, was a nice place, a former theatre perhaps. We realized they didn't have some of the things we had asked for but we could luckily borrow these from other bands.

Bára: A local project played before us. He had about eight people in the audience – three of whom played with their iPhones throughout the gig. After witnessing this, we thought it was pointless, that we'd have nobody at our concert. Our worries didn't materialize and we had quite a lot of people at the gig who stayed until the end. Usually people go in and out of shows there. On big festivals one experience is overshadowed by the next one each hour. It's like the Internet. In a way SXSW reminded us of Facebook, MySpace, Twitter all in one place.

SXSW is a valuable experience for every band. To get out of the familiarity of the clubs where the audience adores you is the only way to find out whether its allure only works in a safe environment. I'm looking forward to the time when bands from planet Earth will play at the Spacevision on Mars and witness what the aliens find rad and drab.

Honza: We experienced a road movie surrounded by amazing nature, slept in a motel straight out of a Coen Brothers film by the Mexican border, learnt to make margaritas, and won an award. America is a big country that doesn't really need Europe. Still, all the musicians told us how great it is for them to play in Europe, as the entire infrastructure at clubs and festivals is much better here. So actually it's okay to be European.


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Photos

Videos

Dva - France trance
DVA - Tropikal Animal
Dva - Tatanc
DVA - Nanuk

Discography

Fonok
Nunovo Tango
Tatanc